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Tag Archives: a.j. liberman

Stapled Copy – 08/15/2012

Hi. this is Tim. I’ve been trying to get myself to write regularly, and have gotten back into buying single comics. So, I will be writing these weekly. These have been comics I have been thinking about for the last month that have inspired this series, so this is a bit of a catch-up post. I’ll hopefully have “this weeks” reviews up and online within the next day or so. My reviews (if you can even call them that) are not about whether I think something is “good”. In essence, this will be more micro-analysis of comics as they come out in single issue form. I will try to not let my opinions or enthusiasm lead my critiques and analysis.

Captain Marvel #1
Kelly Sue DeConnick & Dexter Soy
Marvel

Captain Marvel does several interesting things with its first issue. It analyzes and applies the fluidity of the character’s name/rank to an already-existing Marvel property and by doing so it not only re-launches an old franchise (Captain Marvel), but also revolutionizes another (Ms. Marvel). A previous Captain Marvel (Mar-Vell) introduced a sense of mortality to the Marvel universe and an unwavering sense of courage. Captain America rightfully suggests that Ms. Marvel becomes a part of (and take over) the legacy. This issue has several bold things going on. We have a woman character who is not “Woman” or “Girl” or “Ms.” in namesake – a rarity but also a completely obvious and sensical change that has been seemingly staring Marvel in the face for years. Yes, it takes Captain America to help legitimize her, but that is what he does. In doing so, Marvel creates what potentially could have been stuck as a “girl comic” (which is not necessarily bad, but needlessly limiting and somewhat culturally problematic). This comic simply considers their women readership to be an equal, prominent, and important part of their customer base. This isn’t to say that Marvel masculinized Ms. Marvel or that the only legitimate form of superhero comic is that of a “boy book,” but rather it shifts the idea of the gender-essential superhero canon to something that everyone has always already read. Which is true. Both genders have always read superhero comics, so their very being is not inherently more masculine, but was culturally constructed that way. Captain Marvel tries to shift that mindset in many ways. The comic establishes Carol Danvers as an important hero to the world/universe. It lays the groundwork for a history and development of the character, creating a deep relationship between the reader and a character many Marvel readers may have ignored over the years. This history shows us Danvers’s personal hero, an aged pilot named Helen Cobb. A woman hero with a woman hero. A woman superhero with importance to the Marvel canon with a woman hero who has historical and cultural importance to the diegetic Earth. This gives female readers the potential for the same sense of importance to the character as Danvers has for Cobb – a privilege male readers have had for decades.

 

Archer & Armstrong #1
Fred van Lente, Clayton Henry, Matt Millia
Valiant

I have been very impressed with all the Valiant relaunch titles, and the latest #1 had me really tickled. I didn’t read any of the original Valiant books and quite frankly don’t know anything about them. So, each one of these titles has been a rather joyful surprise. What is introduced with this title is a rather absurd yet completely recognizable representation of American Neo-Conservative culture and a rather biting satire at that. The series opens with a flashback – a pre-known humanity culture arguing over whether to turn on a device. A brother vowing its usage and one suggesting more thought. The device is switched on and (seemingly) destroys all life on Earth. Within the first few pages, the series sets up an ideological tone to the comic’s world – Relativism versus Objectivism. Rationality vs. Absolutism. We flash forward to a Biblical Realism amusement park opens the series and we learn of the training of Archer, a perfect image of a blonde hair/blue eyed ubermensch teen. He is set forth on a secret mission to assassinate the source of ultimate evil – who we learn is the whiskey-slugging, broad-chasing, hangover-dodging, poetry-quoting, heavy-hitting, and seemingly immortal Armstrong. To Archer, he represents the sins of Humanity that must be wiped clean of the Earth. But they stumble on a greater conspiracy that will surely cause the boy a great deal of personal conflict. The book’s reality-as-conspiracy theory has a deeply metaphorical representation of how ideology controls and hegemonizes worldviews and lifestyles. I can’t wait to read more.

 

Harvest #1
A.J. Lieberman & Colin Lorimer
Image

Harvest is a bleak book, particularly in aesthetic. Gray, black, murky greens and blues make up the majority of the color scheme, save for the nostalgia of flashbacks and the viscera of human gore that scatters the pages. A deadbeat playboy surgeon is disbarred and is forced to participate in illegal, underground operations – both to save the unlawful and to generate huge profits from organ harvesting. Deeply tied to America’s current economic crisis, the book shows the desperation of uncertainty and the flexibility of morality – both in the gluttonous over-abundance money and in its horrifying lack.

 

Think Tank #1
Matt Hawkins, Rahsan Ekedal
Top Cow

There is some interesting stuff going on in Think Tank. Dr. David Loren, young genius, works in research and development for future weapons and technology for the American military. David is famous in the department for creating the technology necessary to make drones a functional and effective tool/weapon/force for the military. Faced with the weight of his inventions – arm-chair killings, the overly-easy justification for military force (ie: person-less battle – zero casualty, zero risk, so why not?), domestic surveillance state, etc.., David reverts to transgression as protest. That is, until the military threatens to ruin his life and the life of the only person close enough to him to be considered a friend. The premise is interesting – a person morally objecting to his own work and creations is forced to continue to invent future technology and future violence. His subversion is comical (using military tech to get laid) – but the story is establishing itself to be more. The fact that the comic is presenting a reality of drone-based warfare serves both as education for the readers and as well as possible protest by the creator. It’ll be interesting to see where it goes from here.

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