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Tag Archives: hawkeye

Stapled Copy – 09/12/2012

Think Tank #2
Matt Hawkins, Rahsan Ekedal
Top Cow

Think Tank has a bold tag line – “Danger: Reading this book will make you smarter.” I really liked the first issue, but was dubious about how that tag line would come into play with the narrative. This issue helps demonstrate that the tag line is, I think, right. This book very well might make you smarter. Not in terms of IQ points, per say, but in terms of awareness. The density of content is surprising, especially for a book whose protagonist just wants to get laid and play video games. While Dr. David Loren contemplates his own role in the death of thousands, it reflects a great reality for scientists to consider their role in global progress after the famous words of Dr. Oppenheimer and the Manhattan Project. I found myself considering how the recession, the struggle for employment, and the ways in which one bends their morality in order to pay the bills. The realities of war are always awful, and Hawkins ties the idea to someone just wanting to get paid and being happy with their work. The scariest thing about this book is the fact that Hawkins adds supplemental material in the back to help bring a chilling sense of reality to the goofiness of David’s character and the unsettling violence of the weapons and technology presented in Think Tank’s pages. It’s easy to give a pass on the atrocities of war, as we are not reminded of them on a regular basis, but this book balances grim realities with an engaging and identifiable story. I try to not be definitive with these, but more than just “good” or “readable”, this comic has the potential to go on as being a text of importance – particularly as the discourse of drone-based warfare remains muted from public consciousness.

 

Harbinger #4
Joshua Dysart, Khari Evans, Lewis Larosa, Ian Hannin
Valiant

Harbinger is an intensely disturbing book. Not so much in terms of content, but in the realities of the narrative. This is partially the case due to the book’s ingeniously ambiguous representation of truth. The evil is subtle and disturbing. On one side, you have a rather mysterious mega-corporation with seemingly good public intentions who are secretly collecting an army of super-powered people for unknown reason. We learn in this issue the lengths in which these people are collected – preying on and seducing the naive, unconfident, and even delusional young people with latent powers and exploiting their desire to be special. On the other hand, we have a creepy jerk teenager with complex personal trauma and rage issues. Peter is slowly catching on the weirdness of the corporation…but is it weirdness or paranoia? Are our fears founded, or are we as readers simply reading the intentions of the Harada Corporation through the authority issues of the protagonist? The story is complex. The conflict is subtle, but remarkably intense and makes for an absolutely thrilling read.

 

Hawkeye #2
Matt Fraction, David Aja, Matt Hollingsworth
Marvel


Hawkeye and Clint Barton represent a stark duality of Apollonian (archer metaphor unintended) and Dionysian dualities. The premise of the comic revolves around what Hawkeye’s life is like when he’s not directly working for the Avengers – the off hours, so to speak. Somewhat mild mannered, and the new owner of the iconic #pizzadog, Clint continues to be a hero, even when he doesn’t “have” to be. But, this emphasizes the somewhat absurd opening sentence to this review – Clint straddles the worlds of the perfect-god-hero (Official, card-carrying Avenger) and the self-made, moral, fragile, human being hero. The motives of the story translate further to the aesthetic. While the heavy use of panels creates a frantic sense of action to the story, noticeably the use of color is lacking. Perhaps consisting no more than 3-5 colors, Clint is humanized in contrast to the bright and infinite superhero spectrum.

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